monsterinmoonlight

trashfriend:

little things that actually make a difference to general life happiness:
•drinking lots of water
•eating fresh fruit
•thinking positively about yourself and others
•washing your face twice a day
•changing your sheets once a week
•hot baths with Epsom salts
•face masks using from things in your house
•sleeping more than 7 hours per night
•reorganizing your clothes, makeup, possessions etc
•keeping your living space clean

shannonwest

Anonymous asked:

I totally agree with you. I've seen posts that say that makeup is not feminist and sure enough someone will respond saying, "stop shaming women for their personal choices." It's ok to like things that aren't feminist, just don't act like it's some revolutionary act. I'm actually very feminine and I love makeup, but I'm not gonna act like I'm smashing the patriarchy or that I'm being stigmatized for it.

daniellemertina answered:

Personally choosing to wear or not wear makeup is not a feminist issue. It doesn’t affect a woman’s status in feminism.

The feminist issue is that women are told by a multi-billion dollar industry that they’re ugly and worthless if they don’t use makeup. It’s a feminist issue that it’s been proven that women who don’t wear make up have a harder time securing a job.

That’s where feminism *should* be getting involved. But liberal feminism doesn’t really address this because it’s stuck on the “don’t shame me for wearing make up” stage. 

shannonwest
Well, female friendships are fucking extraordinary. They don’t have to be sexual to be intense love affairs. A breakup with a female friend can be more traumatic than a breakup with a lover. I’ve always been attracted to stories that look at the love-hate complexity of close female friendships. It’s ripe for drama. Did you see Frances Ha? That portrayed a female friendship I really understood.
Keira Knightley (x)

3rd sentence is the whole truth

shannonwest

There is this odd trend
of taken women
saying they are too much,
and how the men they love
are amazing for dealing with them.

Love should not be a responsibility.
You should not have to deal with me.
Just because a woman is wild
and free
does not mean she is difficult.
He is not a martyr for loving me
through the good
and not so good.

Some mornings I will wake up swinging,
you do not get a gold star
for still loving me.

Some mornings I will wake up like a lamb,
you do not get a gold star
for loving me.

I am not a hurricane of a girl,
you always have the chance to leave.

Michelle K., Hurricanes. (via therainssmallhands)
gannetguts
wolfpangs:

Ronda and I have been talking about my deep and abiding love for sadness tv, so we decided I would make a list of the sad stuff I watch. Some of these are on hiatus, have concluded, etc, but I assure y’all, they remain sad.
The Leftovers: Probably the king of sad TV right now. The AVClub even theorized that while on its face it’s about loss, at heart it’s really about depression. Anyway, the gist is these people were left behind and now they’re sad about it. But they were also kind of sad before. Now in the present, Holy Wayne can hug out your sadness, apparently, but he also seems to be dying.Masters of Sex: Masters and Johnson are just getting to the root (punintended) of sexual dysfunction and everyone’s sad about it. Also, it’s the 50s, so there’s also repressed homosexuality (reminder: still considered a mental illness at the time) and, of course, racism.The Strain: There’s a vampire epidemic and everyone’s learning to be sad about it. There are also occasional flashbacks to the glory days (and death rattle) of the Third Reich, so there’s some extra sadness. Finally, there’s Corey Stoll’s wig.Manhattan: Bright “lights” are being extinguished all over Europe (and the Pacific Theater), so you better believe it’s sad. Meanwhile, in the American desert, scientists are working on the Manhattan Project and as they bicker over which design is better, you kinda want to knock their little eggheads together and tell them everyone’s going to get a bite at the apple. Probably the saddest thing, besides knowing what’s coming for Hiroshima and Nagasaki, is that people think they can make a “gadget,” as they call the atomic bombs they’re working on, or an anything, that can “stop all wars.” And you guys are supposed to be geniuses. BONUS: Note the weirdness (read: racism) with which they treat the NDNs and Latin@s whose desert they’ve invaded to build their death-from-above gadgets.Salem: It’s Salem, during the witch hysteria.Penny Dreadful: Victorian repression, mental illness, the white man’s burden…oh, and monsters.The Knick: Surgery during the nascent electrification of America was not as fun as you’d might imagine. Picture the basic machinery one would use. Now picture hand-pumping them. Why don’t all the surgeons wash their hands in the same basins while we’re at it? Perfect! Hey, has penicillin been discovered yet? No? Great. The Bridge: There is little happiness on either side of the border. There are some bros who will make the argument that drugs should be legalized because they’ll kill cartels dead, but the thing is, cartels are multi-million—probably even multi-billion; I’m not googling “how much money do cartels make?”—dollar crime organizations. They’ve long since pushed their tentacles past drugs into all sorts of industries, which is one of the themes of this second season. (The first season was basically a carbon copy of the original Danish series, which I’ve not seen. I have seen the British/French version, though. Anyway, I’m liking this season more than the first.)
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wolfpangs:

Ronda and I have been talking about my deep and abiding love for sadness tv, so we decided I would make a list of the sad stuff I watch. Some of these are on hiatus, have concluded, etc, but I assure y’all, they remain sad.

The Leftovers: Probably the king of sad TV right now. The AVClub even theorized that while on its face it’s about loss, at heart it’s really about depression. Anyway, the gist is these people were left behind and now they’re sad about it. But they were also kind of sad before. Now in the present, Holy Wayne can hug out your sadness, apparently, but he also seems to be dying.

Masters of Sex: Masters and Johnson are just getting to the root (punintended) of sexual dysfunction and everyone’s sad about it. Also, it’s the 50s, so there’s also repressed homosexuality (reminder: still considered a mental illness at the time) and, of course, racism.

The Strain: There’s a vampire epidemic and everyone’s learning to be sad about it. There are also occasional flashbacks to the glory days (and death rattle) of the Third Reich, so there’s some extra sadness. Finally, there’s Corey Stoll’s wig.

Manhattan: Bright “lights” are being extinguished all over Europe (and the Pacific Theater), so you better believe it’s sad. Meanwhile, in the American desert, scientists are working on the Manhattan Project and as they bicker over which design is better, you kinda want to knock their little eggheads together and tell them everyone’s going to get a bite at the apple. Probably the saddest thing, besides knowing what’s coming for Hiroshima and Nagasaki, is that people think they can make a “gadget,” as they call the atomic bombs they’re working on, or an anything, that can “stop all wars.” And you guys are supposed to be geniuses. BONUS: Note the weirdness (read: racism) with which they treat the NDNs and Latin@s whose desert they’ve invaded to build their death-from-above gadgets.

Salem: It’s Salem, during the witch hysteria.

Penny Dreadful: Victorian repression, mental illness, the white man’s burden…oh, and monsters.

The Knick: Surgery during the nascent electrification of America was not as fun as you’d might imagine. Picture the basic machinery one would use. Now picture hand-pumping them. Why don’t all the surgeons wash their hands in the same basins while we’re at it? Perfect! Hey, has penicillin been discovered yet? No? Great.

The Bridge: There is little happiness on either side of the border. There are some bros who will make the argument that drugs should be legalized because they’ll kill cartels dead, but the thing is, cartels are multi-million—probably even multi-billion; I’m not googling “how much money do cartels make?”—dollar crime organizations. They’ve long since pushed their tentacles past drugs into all sorts of industries, which is one of the themes of this second season. (The first season was basically a carbon copy of the original Danish series, which I’ve not seen. I have seen the British/French version, though. Anyway, I’m liking this season more than the first.)

Read More