bellecosby

iwilleatyourenglish:

say it with me everyone: HARMFUL STATEMENTS ABOUT MINORITIES ARE NOT OPINIONS.

an opinion is that apple pie is the best pie flavor, or that Titanic is overrated.

saying “bisexual people are just confused/greedy” or “trans* women aren’t ‘real’ women” or “people of…

alisonhendrix4bethchilds
Likewise, “Orphan Black,” though obviously female-centric, does not make bank on the “revelation” that women can be good and bad, timid and violent, strong and susceptible Just Like Men. Instead, it plays with the nature of family with the same dexterity it brings to the definition of identity. What is a mother, a child, a sister, a friend, and what is expected of and owed to each?
thewaywardqueen

stem-cell:

deonte-s:

the idea of harry potter not only straddling two worlds between him (the british wizarding world and the british muggle world) but also being met at each end by two entirely different systems of historical dehumanization/subjugation (with harry on one hand being a half-blood in a society built on blood pedigree and on the other hand being black mixed-race in a society built on white supremacy) is at once extremely tragic and extremely compelling narratively

it’s also interesting that either status has a completely negligible effect within the opposite world (i.e. harry’s blood status means nothing in muggle britain and his race means nothing in wizarding britain)

mixed-race harry continues to rise to the top as the most narratively compelling interpretation of the text

autostraddle

thefeministpress:

—Kate from Autostraddle advocates for more ladies loving ladies in fanfiction

deathbeforediet
Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virle. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched.
Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth  (via thewastedgeneration)